License Used
unspecified
Media
Text
2009
Tags
OER, government, open textbook
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At the request of Governor Schwarzenegger, California Secretary of Education Glen Thomas will work with State Superintendent of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell and State Board of Education President Ted Mitchell to develop a state approved list of standards-aligned, open-source digital textbooks for high school math and science.

From government to non-profit organizations, teachers to textbook publishers, we all have a role to play in leveraging 21st century technology to expand learning and better serve California's students, parents, teachers and schools. This initiative will ensure our schools know which digital textbooks stand up to California's academic content standards - so these cost-effective resources can be used in our schools to help ensure each and every student has access to a world-class education. — Arnold Schwarzenegger

Overview

In May 2009, at the request of Governor Schwarzennegger, California Secretary of Education Glen Thomas will work with State Superintendent of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell and State Board of Education President Ted Mitchell to develop a state approved list of standards-aligned, open-source digital textbooks for high school math and science. The initiative reviews existing free digital textbooks against California’s rigorous academic standards to identify which free textbooks are standards-aligned and may be used in California’s classrooms.

The first phase of Governor Schwarzenegger’s digital textbook initiative focused on high school geometry, algebra II, trigonometry, calculus, physics, chemistry, biology/life science and earth science digital textbooks. In August 2009, the Schwarzenegger announced that 16 free digital textbooks for high school math and science classes met at least 90 percent of California’s academic standards, and four met 100 percent.

Thusfar, the approved digital textbooks may be used as supplementary materials. In order for materials to become a required text, they must meet every standard, including California’s social content standards, which none of the digital textbooks have been reviewed for yet.

Phase II, starting in January 2010, invites content developers to submit textbooks for review against California’s academic content standards in the areas of linear algebra; probability and statistics; world history, culture and geography; U.S. history and geography; American democracy; and economics. Review of submitted digital textbooks will be coordinated by the California Learning Resources Network (CLRN) and conducted by expert teachers and content specialists.

Unlike Phase I, which had a submission deadline, Phase II will review textbooks on a rolling basis so that completed digital books do not have to wait until a submission window opens to get state approval.

License Usage

Of the 16 textbooks submitted in phase 1, 15 are openly licensed under one of the Creative Commons licenses. All 10 that passed 90% of CA’s state standards are CC licensed.


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