Porting Project

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This page is meant to aggregate information, discussions, arguments and opinions about CC's porting project.

Creative Commons first published licenses in late 2001. In 2002, Creative Commons created its license porting project, which is unique in the public license arena. Generally stated, porting involves the translation and legal adaptation of CC's core license suite (the international suite, formerly known as the "unported" or "generic" license suite) to the languages and copyright laws of individual jurisdictions. As a result of the project, CC has ported licenses in more than 55 jurisdictions, and hosts 550+ unique licenses across all versions. [1]

Porting has been a historical feature of CC's affiliate activities. It has been the subject of much discussion and debate, both favorable and unfavorable. During our 2011 Global Summit, CC and the affiliates discussed the future of the porting project. Based on input, CC has decided not to make a decision on the future of porting while version 4.0 is in development. CC plans to consult with its affiliates and communities as well as other stakeholders and experts prior to making decisions that could affect the continuation of porting. That consultation process is expected to take place near the conclusion of the 4.0 versioning process to allow everyone to focus their attention squarely on the 4.0 versioning process. In the interim, please feel free to contribute your constructive opinions and ideas here.

Benefits of Porting

Risks/Challenges of Porting

Other comments

Resources/Related Discussion

Please note that CC’s policy is not to begin any new porting projects as we are currently preparing for version 4.0. CC encourages the members of its CC Affiliate Network to build a robust, diverse community of users and to undertake community-building activities.

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  1. ↑ See CC Ports by Jurisdiction where all ports across all versions of the licenses are referenced.