How to Make Your Research Open Access (Whether You're at Harvard or Not)

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Events

Webcast in Cambridge, MA, USA

2012/10/23

http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/events/luncheon/2012/10/OAweek


How do you make your own work open access (OA)? The question comes up from researchers at schools with good OA policies (like Harvard and MIT) and at schools with no OA policies at all. We invite you to join Peter Suber and Stuart Shieber of the Harvard Open Access Project, the Berkman Center community, and Office for Scholarly Communication in an open forum on the Harvard OA policies, concrete steps for making your work OA, and questions on any aspect of OA, especially from the perspective of publishing researchers.

About Peter

Peter Suber's work consists of research, writing, organizing, advocacy, and pro bono consulting for open access to research. He is the Director of the Harvard Open Access Project, Special Advisor to the Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication, Faculty Fellow at the Berkman Center, Senior Researcher at SPARC, Research Professor of Philosophy at Earlham College, Open Access Project Director at Public Knowledge, and author of the SPARC Open Access Newsletter. He blogs at Google Plus. His latest book is Open Access.

About Stuart

Stuart Shieber is James O. Welch, Jr. and Virginia B. Welch Professor of Computer Science in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. His primary research field is computational linguistics, the study of human languages from the perspective of computer science. His research contributions have extended beyond that field as well, to theoretical linguistics, natural-language processing, computer-human interaction, automated graphic design, the philosophy of artificial intelligence, computer privacy and security, and computational biology. He is the founding director of the Center for Research on Computation and Society and a director of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society.